Limit cut to 20kmh

A well-used road that runs through Little Shoal Bay Reserve is set for a speed reduction.

The move by North Shore City Council is to increase safety for park users in response to public concern, council community services and parks committee chairman Tony Holman says.

Shore resident and former mayor George Wood says the change from 30kmh to 20kmh will affect about 6000 residents.

It is being carried out in “the most cack-handed way”, he says.

The Land Transport Rule 2003 – Setting Speed Limits has strict requirements that police and the New Zealand Transport Agency should be consulted, Mr Wood says.

“It would also be interesting to know how much more air pollution is caused by cars accelerating from a slower speed when climbing the steep grade at the bottom of Maritime Tce.”

The section affected is not a legal road and is governed under the Reserves Act 1977, council parks policy and planning manager Terry Baxter says.

The land has been a reserve for more than 100 years, including at least 50 years before the harbour bridge was built when there was little traffic in the area.

Through-traffic has been the subject of much debate and councillors could have proposed a traffic ban for the land which runs close to a popular playground and boat haul area, she says.

Mr Holman says the Birkenhead-Northcote Community Board voted unanimously in favour of the reduction, as did the majority of councillors in a recent committee meeting.

A management plan for the area was drawn up in the 1990s and public submissions then pushed for lowered speed, which finally looks set to happen, he says.

He likens the land to Cornwall Park where special rules apply to traffic.

“I cannot believe anyone would want to increase danger to park users for a few seconds difference in travel time.”

Speed reduction submissions close on February 10.

Credits

Written by: MICHELLE ROBINSON
Reprinted with permission: Auckland Now – North Shore Times

Wetland weeds get the chop

Maritime Terrace project leader Adrian Meys of Birkenhead plants native trees at a property where wattles and monkey apple trees have been felled and injected to stop them growing again.DIGGIN IN: Maritime Terrace project leader Adrian Meys of Birkenhead plants native trees at a property where wattles and monkey apple trees have been felled and injected to stop them growing again.

Residents concerned at the spread of weeds in the Little Shoal Bay wetland and surrounding bush reserve have banded together to do something about it.

Every month, a working bee has been gathering to save native trees and emerging shrubs from morning glory which has already killed off a number of treeferns.

Rafts of wild ginger have been cut back and treated and in their place shrubs, flax and other natives have been planted.

Local resident Adrian Meys has been talking with others about getting rid of the source of the worst problem in and around the wetland, Australian wattles, whose seeds spread around the wetland in their thousands.

Recently residents and property owners planted about 800 native trees in the area to improve the environment and reduce the risk of the wattle and acmena seeds spreading across the wetland again.

If you are interested in helping, contact the local volunteer group by phoning Adrian on 419-4977 or Keith on 021-240-9414.

Credits

Reprinted with permission: Auckland Now – North Shore Times